News & Events

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Americans opting out of Obamacare based on religious grounds, have turned to “health care sharing ministries" which do not cover pre-existing conditions. Janet Coffman, an associate professor at PRL-IHPS says that excluding some individuals from coverage sends a mixed message to Christian members.
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Anisha Patel, MD, was invited to the White House, as First Lady Michelle Obama announced the results of a campaign to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage consumption for kids. Anisha was only one of 60 guests who were invited to attend the ceremony, based on her work on this issue at UCSF.
Anisha Patel, MD, was invited to the White House, as First Lady Michelle Obama announced the results of a campaign to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage consumption for kids. Anisha was one of only 60 guests who were invited to attend the ceremony, based on her work on this issue at UCSF.
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Starting 7/15, certified nurse practitioners in Kentucky will be able to prescribe medications. Joanne Spetz, a professor at PRL-IHPS, UCSF, says the success of Kentucky’s law will depend on whether there are enough MDs available to collaborate while NPs develop their knowledge about medications.
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Despite an improved economy, Union leaders are anticipating Kaiser will propose budget cuts prompting a nursing strike. Joanne Spetz, an economics professor at the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies says. “If there is growth, nurses should also benefit from the increased revenue.”
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Two newly appointed UCSF Urology Chief Residents, Drs. Lindsay Hampson and Anobel Odisho, were recognized by UCSF’s Graduate Medical Education (GME) office, receiving this year’s Excellence and Innovation in GME award.
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Joanne Spetz, PhD., Professor of Economics, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, UCSF and other leading health experts describe the challenges facing the nursing market today and the best opportunities for nurses entering the field.
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Violations of privacy are increasing as more adolescents and young adults gain coverage on their parents’ health insurance plans. Adult children now can stay on their parents' health insurance plans until they're 26 years old, but without the same confidentiality protections of individual plans.
Violations of privacy are increasing as more adolescents and young adults gain coverage on their parents’ health insurance plans. Adult children now can stay on their parents' health insurance plans until they're 26 years old, but without the same confidentiality protections of individual plans.
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Genomic Sequencing: Assessing The Health Care System, Policy, And Big-Data Implications. Kathryn A. Phillips, Julia R. Trosman, Robin K. Kelley, Mark J. Pletcher, Michael P. Douglas, and Christine B. Weldon; Health Affairs, 33, no.7 (2014):1246-1253 doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2014.0020