OUR PEOPLE

Naomi Bardach, MD

Professor
School of Medicine
3333 California Street
San Francisco, CA 94118
Image
Naomi Bardach
Education and Training

University of California, San Francisco, , Residency - School of Medicine

University of California, San Francisco, , M.D. - 2003 Medicine

University of California, San Francisco, , M.A.S. in Clinical Research - 2012 Graduate Division (Advance Training in Clinical Research)

University of California, San Francisco, CA, - 2019 Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Champion Training

Awards and Honors

2015 Nemours Child Health Services Research Award | 2015
2015 Nemours Child Health Services Research Award, 2015
Overview
Dr. Bardach is a Professor of Pediatrics and Policy in the Department of Pediatrics and the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California San Francisco. She is Vice Chair of Health Services Research in the Department of Pediatrics. In recognition of her passion and capacity for mentoring, she received the UCSF Academic Senate Distinction in Mentoring Award for Associate Professors in 2020. Her research program is focused on improving the quality of inpatient and outpatient pediatric care, with a foundation in implementation and dissemination science. She is co-investigator on two of the AHRQ-funded U18 Pediatric Quality Measurement Program (PQMP) grants to support development and testing of pediatric quality measures. Clinical conditions of focus for those grants are asthma, sickle cell, mental health, and inpatient to outpatient transitions of care. As PI of an NICHD-funded R01, she is collecting reports on patient safety events from family and patients on the pediatric inpatient unit at the point of care, and making those reports rapidly available to clinicians and quality improvement staff. Specific areas of interest for Dr. Bardach are: quality measurement; the use of the measures in interventions such as, public reporting, internal quality improvement, and financial incentive programs, to drive better health outcomes for children and reduce disparities in care; and leveraging technology to integrate patient and caregiver voices into quality improvement efforts.